Weekly Events

 

Morning Meditation with Labyrinth Walk on Tuesdays

We walk a canvas Labyrinth that is modelled on the 12th century labyrinth found in Chartres Cathedral, France. In recent years, walking the labyrinth has re-emerged as a meditative practice and a symbolic image of pilgrimage, not in the geographical sense, but of the journey we each make through life: a journey to the centre, a return to the heart, back to the Spirit who faithfully waits for us.

The labyrinth is an archetypal image which emerged in different cultures over 4000 years ago; it is a mirror or metaphor for the spiritual journey and the evolutionary spiral of life. The labyrinth is a single, spiralling path that leads to a central area. You walk the same path back out returning to the beginning. There are no tricks or dead ends unlike mazes. The meditation lasts approximately 45 minutes and includes a short reading. No prior experience of meditation or labyrinths needed.

Click here for more information on labyrinths.

For those who wish to stay, we share a simple breakfast of croissants and coffee/teas.

Tuesdays 7.45am – 8.30am

Suggested donation £3 – £5. Donations go towards the running costs of overheads of All Saints Church.  


Morning Meditation on Saturdays

We start with a short reading from the book ‘Coming to Your Senses’ by Jon Kabat-Zinn followed by 25 minutes of sitting meditation.
The second 30 minutes is an ancient form of contemplative practice called ‘lectio divina’, literally meaning divine reading. The invitation of lectio divina is to cultivate a heart-centred intimacy with the sacred text of the Bible. We listen deeply with “the ear of our hearts” (St Benedict). No prior experience needed.

For those who wish to stay, we share a simple breakfast of croissants and coffee/teas.

Saturdays 8am – 9am

Suggested donation £3 – £5. Donations contribute to the running costs of All Saints Church.  


“Contemplation is spontaneous awe at the sacredness of life, of being. It is gratitude for life, for awareness and for being.” Thomas Merton